Advice for a Forty-Odder from a Twenty-Something

At the Kilgour lectures, OCLC President Robert Jordan said some rather challenging things to the assembled SILS throng. As an MBA and business guy, he up front admitted that his ideas might rub people the wrong way (but then, so did Fred Kilgour's). One of his ideas that stuck with me was his notion that, since UNC SILS requires a student to take more hours and do more work than comparable programs, it's reasonable to ask whether the degree will make you more money or give you a chance at a more prestigious institution when you graduate.

That idea rattles around in the back of my brain during my classes, even the fun intellectual ones I take. And then, so do articles like this one by Penelope Trunk, on what to do in college to be more successful in your career. Of course, she's talking to twenty-somethings rather than forty-odders, but let's see how much of it I can apply to my situation.

  • Get out of the library. Hm, well, the point of my going to back to school is to get out of the office and spend time in a library (and it is a library school, after all). I have a lot of work and life experience, but I want the education to formalize what I know and give me a framework to learn new things.
  • Get involved on campus. It's tough to be involved with many school activities because I don't live on-campus, parking is a joke, and I have to give up the hours I would normally work to be on campus for special events. I read somewhere that being involved in career-oriented organizations--like ACM or ASIS&T--are preferred over school-related ones, given the brief time I have to devote to extra-curriculars. Also, although I'm plenty involved with outside groups, I've never been asked about such participations in an interview and I don't put them on my resume. At this stage, I have plenty of career experience that takes precedence.
  • Separate your expectations from those of your parents. I would amend this to include co-workers and friends. I would also amend this to yourself. Some older adults going back to school see the degree as the end-all and that the degree will, on its own, open doors to new opportunity. It won't. My expectations are that my pursuit of the degree will open the doors--the hours spent studying, reading, thinking, meeting people, and so on. By the time the degree is handed to me on graduation day, I should already have plans in place for what happens the day after.
  • Try new things you aren't good at. Just going back to school is a big new thing. To me, any other new thing is a little new thing.
  • Make your job search a top priority. Ye-e-es, I agree, to a point. If you hate your job, or don't have a job, getting a job should be the most important thing. In my case, since I'm already working, I'm more concerned with meeting people affiliated with the school and its mission who are in a position to offer jobs. So I would say that meeting people and expanding my network is a top priority.
  • Take an acting course. I used to act in community theater and in college; it's a great place for meeting people. I think most people, though, would get more out of an improv comedy course: learning to think on your feet, under pressure, with people watching you, is a great experience to have. I took one at Dirty South Comedy Theater in January 2006 and it was a great experience. I actually felt my brain make new connections and re-shape itself. Bizarre. I'd like to take another course again.
  • Get rid of your perfectionist streak. My goal in school is to get B or better grades so that I can 1) get tuition reimbursement from my employer and 2) not obsess over my schoolwork. As one of my managers drilled into me, "Just give me 80 percent. Your quality level is already high enough that it'll be better than someone else's 100 percent." The key is to balance effort against value: if it's a paper that only counts 10 points, it'll get less attention than the presentation worth 30 points. Depend on your teachers/teammates for feedback indicating if the work isn't good enough.
  • Work your way through college. Heh. Next.
  • Make to-do lists. I'm performing much better in school having spent the last 20 years learning about productivity and efficiency systems. My favorite methodology at the moment is Mark Forster's book Do It Tomorrow. (Mark's Blog.) Considering that I'm now juggling a full-time job, family, banjo practice, and school, efficiency and productivity help me keep it all together.